Review: ‘The Wedding Singer’ is a ‘colorful’ performance filled with humor, drama and enthusiasm

The+Wedding+Singer+tells+the+story+of+wedding+singer+Robbie%2C+his+failed+relationship+with+his+former+fianc%C3%A9e+Linda+and+his+budding+romance+with+the+newly+engaged+Julia.+%28Photo+courtesy+of+Caroline+Burns+22%29

‘The Wedding Singer’ tells the story of wedding singer Robbie, his failed relationship with his former fiancée Linda and his budding romance with the newly engaged Julia. (Photo courtesy of Caroline Burns ’22)

Shiloh Harrill

After watching a special performance of “The Wedding Singer” by the Marquis Players, it is difficult for me to imagine that the group has met any challenges this semester.

The performance transcended the unpredictability of both COVID-19 and the weather in a way that brings the audience joy as they sit for an outdoor, in-person theater performance. This musical exudes enthusiasm and charming humor that will certainly leave any audience entertained. 

The musical tells the story of wedding singer Robbie (played by Cormac Hurley ’24), his failed relationship with his former fiancée Linda (Maddy Proulx ’21) and his newly discovered love Julia (Sarah Frankel ’21). After Linda leaves Robbie at the altar, he falls into a deep sadness but is encouraged by his bandmates Sammy (Ronald Kelson ’24) and George (Matthew White ’23) along with his grandma Rosie (Meredith Forman ’24) to get back on his feet and continue singing.

Julia, a recently engaged yet discontent waitress, becomes a friend for Robbie. Given the absence of Julia’s fiancé Glen (Keenan Barr ’22), Julia and Robbie develop a friendship that eventually turns into a romantic interest on both sides.  A whole slew of chaotic yet comical events ensue as Julia and Robbie finally realize and admit their feelings for one another in the grand finale. 

The natural chemistry between the performers was just one of many reasons why the performance was such a success. Frankel and Hurley portray Julia and Robbie so well, with natural stage chemistry that heightens the sense of dramatic irony for the audience, as well as the perfect degree of charm and wit. Additionally, the friendship between Julia and Holly (Lauren Stango ’22) is heartwarming and comical. Proulx portrays Linda with such a perfect level of sass and charm that her character is irresistible to the audience, despite her “villainous” role in the play as the woman who breaks Robbie’s heart. 

The ensemble is incredibly coordinated in terms of choreography, costuming, and vocals. If there is one word to describe this performance, it’s “colorful.” The excitement that each Marquis player brings to the stage makes it so that the audience cannot view the show without laughing, or at least smiling from ear to ear. The set pieces, costumes and voices are vivid and vibrant.

And the scene where Linda leaves Robbie at the altar is portrayed with such dramatic flair and comical sorrow that the audience is likely to laugh while simultaneously feeling pity for the characters. The show is a treat to watch, especially if White is doing vocals for the Shapiro bar mitzvah ceremony! The performance is one that will spark emotions in any audience member. 

“The Wedding Singer” is directed by Billy Devito ’22, produced by Sarah Orttung ’22 and stage managed by Lizzie Gumula ’22. It is very clear that their efforts have been successful, as the show is a treat. 

The Marquis Players are planning to hold in-person shows (at reduced capacity) from May 6-9 at the amphitheater; a recorded version will also be available online. In-person and virtual tickets can be purchased now.