The Oldest College Newspaper in Pennsylvania

The Lafayette

The Oldest College Newspaper in Pennsylvania

The Lafayette

The Oldest College Newspaper in Pennsylvania

The Lafayette

Lafayette History

Shayne Figureoa 99 (front, center) spearheaded a change from Arts to Arts & Entertainment during her tenure. (Photo courtesy of Lafayette College Archives)

What’s in a name?: The evolution of arts coverage in The Lafayette

By Madeline Marriott and Trebor Maitin January 27, 2023

As Pennsylvania’s oldest college newspaper, the content and form of The Lafayette have always been in flux. From its 1870s roots as a monthly publication by the senior class to the introduction of color...

Previous chair of the Board of Trustees Larry Ramer financially supported the development of the Ramer History House.

The history behind the history house

By Bernadette Russo, Arts & Culture Editor December 9, 2022

Throughout Lafayette’s nearly 200-year history, the buildings on campus as we know them today have been ever-changing, many following the patterns of Greek life. One such building is the Ramer History...

Previous Rivalry Week traditions included erecting sky-high bonfires on the center of the Quad. (Photo courtesy of the College Archives)

Rivalry Week traditions through the years

By Elisabeth Seidel, Contributing Writer November 18, 2022

From building bonfires as tall as Pardee Hall to hitting junkyard cars with mallets, Lafayette students have come up with many creative ways to show their disdain for Lehigh University after 138 years...

The $5,000 reward for information leading to the location of Joseph Crater would be nearly $90,000 in todays money. (Photo courtesy of The New York Daily News).

The Lafayette alum who became the ‘missingest man in America’

By Madeline Marriott, Arts & Culture Editor October 28, 2022

Corruption, political intrigue, showgirls, mobsters and New York City brothels were just a few puzzle pieces of the perplexing 1930 disappearance of Judge Joseph Crater, New York State Supreme Court Justice...

Garlic Fest started as part of an Easton Farmers Market-themed event.

But why garlic?: How Easton’s Garlic Fest came to be

By Bernadette Russo, Arts & Culture Editor October 7, 2022

Vampires, beware! This weekend, downtown Easton hosted its 19th annual Garlic Fest, bringing stinky spirit to the city.  Vendors and visitors alike braved the rainy weather on Saturday and Sunday to...

Members of ALW march in the colleges first Take Back the Night in 1993. From L-R, Nora Isaacs 94, Eileen Kelly 94, Laine Fast 94, Jennifer Devlin Burke 94, Ellie Dunham Kelley 94, Laura Bennett Brogan 94, Katrina Zafiriadis 95 and Jennifer Edwards 94. (Photo courtesy of Jennifer Devlin Burke 94)

‘If we don’t, who will?’: Fifty years of sexual assault peer education at Lafayette

By Katie Frost, Managing Editor April 29, 2022

Beginning next fall, the administration will be taking over aspects of sexual assault peer education at the college. This shift marks a change in the way peer education has been done on campus for years....

Eastons train station fell into disrepair after the Lehigh Valley Railroad abandoned its last passenger trains in 1961. (Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress)

What happened to Easton’s train station?

By Gilad Evans, Contributing Writer April 22, 2022

Buses and cars are generally thought to be the only forms of transportation available to Lafayette students in Easton. But for a good portion of the 20th century, another reliable manner of going to and...

The military camp remained on Lafayette’s campus through the 1960s, leading the development of the ROTC program. (Photo courtesy of Lafayette College)

How Lafayette became a military training camp during WWI

By Yumna Hussain, Contributing Writer April 8, 2022

In April of 1917, the United States declared war on Germany, bringing the country into World War I.  During this tumultuous time for the nation, Lafayette College was converted into a military training...

The Chateau was owned by the Kirby family until 1983 when it was donated to the college. Photo taken in 1983. (Photo courtesy of Lafayette College Special Collections)

Lafayette’s castle on the hill: A look at the Chateau

By Katie Frost, Managing Editor November 5, 2021

Before football games could be broadcast on national television, Lafayette alumni sat on the patio of the Chateau, the college's large Norman French-style house on College Hill, and watched every home...

Once hosting primarily Presbyterian services, Colton Chapel is now home to the spiritual life of many different religious groups on campus. (Photo by Lauren Yoder 25)

A Presbyterian past and interfaith present: Religious life at Lafayette through the decades

By Lauren Yoder September 24, 2021

Although it may go unnoticed by many students, Lafayette College’s affiliation with the Presbyterian Church has been present since 1854 and continues to the present day. While this affiliation does not...

A photograph of the old Observatory in present day Colton Chapel.

Lafayette used to have what?: A look into the college’s defunct amenities and traditions

By Colton Summers September 24, 2021

Imagine a stroll across campus in 1945. There's a military drill taking place on the quad. A room in Kirby Hall is filled with firearms. Hogg Hall has a bowling alley in its basement. By college mandate,...

Camp Lafayette on the Lafayette College quad in the early 1900s. (Photo courtesy of the Lafayette College Archives)

Sickness through the centuries: How Lafayette handled outbreaks from the Spanish flu to the swine flu

By Trebor Maitin May 21, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic is far from the first outbreak that Lafayette has faced throughout its history. How the College and the Lehigh Valley handled this pandemic and all pandemics past has been recorded...

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