Chi Phi Applies

William Gordon

Fraternity officially applies to return to campus

By William Gordon ‘17 and Rachel Robertson ‘18

Collaborative Writers

Chi Phi became the first fraternity to apply for official recognition by the college on Tuesday through the college’s new application process for Greek organizations.

The group—made up of about 30 interested students—applied to be an interest group, the first step of a three-step application process. A group can be an interest group for up to six months, but President of Chi Phi Rho Chapter Jack Poetzsch ‘16 said they are looking to finish this step as quickly as possible to move on in the application process.

“Our goal, and my biggest goal, is to be living as a group in Vallamont by next fall,” Poetzsch said.

Vallamont, Chi Phi’s old house, is currently being used as a residence hall by the college.

If Chi Phi does not receive recognition by the school by the beginning of the fall semester, the college will have to renegotiate their contract to use Vallamont, according to college liaison andChi Phi Rho Chapter advisor Jerome Blakeslee ‘70. The contract, Blakeslee said,may be negotiated for use of the house a semester at a time, instead of the existing contract lasting for two semesters.

The Lafayette previously reported that both Blakeslee and Poetzsch anticipate the application process, which usually will take over two semesters, will be shortened for the Chi Phi Rho Chapter since they are presently recognized by their national organization. When interviewed at that time, Vice President of Campus Life Annette Diorio said she could not comment on any specific organizations, but the length of the process could vary based on the group’s connection with their national organization.

Diorio declined to comment further for this article, since she is not part of the interest group application process and cannot comment on specific groups.

Chi Phi was kicked off campus 10 years ago for violating an alcohol policy.

“I think what the college was looking at, for us especially, was, ‘What are we putting in place to make sure that the incidents that have happened in the past with Chi Phi will never happen again?’” Poetzsch said. “And our application really…does a good job of explaining that…[The college] want[s] to see that we won’t be a problem as opposed to an asset.”

To be an asset to the college, according to Poetzsch, Chi Phi will do community service and provide a unique experience to existing Greek life on campus.

“Really it just comes down to providing a positive experience for students,” Poetzsch said. “Giving more students a chance to fit in somewhere, to belong to an organization that they think their values tie into our values.”

Advisor to Fraternities and Sororities Daniel Ayala did not respond for comment in time for deadline.